Sporadic

and

The J.T. Oliver Photo Collection

Remembering Al Andrews

Letters from Lloyd Biggle, Jr. 1959-1982

Remembering Pittcon (1960)

by
Bill Plott

All files are in PDF format

Bill writes:

I live in Montevallo, Alabama, and was an active fan in the late 1950s and early 1960s. I attended two Worldcons, published a genzine and an apazine. I was one of the founders of the Southern Fandom Press Alliance. I returned to fandom in 2012, attended DSC 50, rejoined the SFPA and resurrected my old apazine Sporadic for SFPA. Current issues will be posted on this page.

Sporadic #19 Sporadic #20 Sporadic #21
Sporadic #22 Sporadic #23 Sporadic #24
Sporadic #25 Sporadic #26 Sporadic #27
Sporadic #28 Sporadic #29 Sporadic #30
Sporadic #31 Sporadic #32 Sporadic #33
Sporadic #34 Sporadic #35 Sporadic #36
Sporadic #37 Sporadic #38 Sporadic #39
Sporadic #40 Sporadic #41 Sporadic #42
Sporadic #43    

 

In my teenage years, when Southern fans were few and far between, I picked up the nickname of “The Traveling Fan” for a while, largely due to my quest to find kindred spirits. I visited J.T. Oliver in Columbus, Georgia - he was among a small group of active fans in the 1950s there - and he gave me an envelope full of photos, which are shared in the one-shot photo album below. I have identified and annotated the photos to the best of my ability.

Alfred McCoy Andrews, 1928-70, was a founding member of the Southern Fandom Press Alliance, and Southern Fandom Group, co-publisher and editor of IscarioT, dedicated correspondent, genuinely funny guy, and good friend. This one-shot by Bill Plott and Larry Montgomery is in his memory.

In 1959 the full-time writing career of former music professor Lloyd Biggle Jr. was going along swimmingly. Stories were appearing in Galaxy, If, Fantastic and other popular digest-size magazines. Then, he made a mistake. He had a story called “A Taste of Fire” published in Amazing Stories. This resulted in a teenager in Alabama writing a praising letter to the editor.

Biggle answered the letter with a simple thank you postcard. The lonely fan in Alabama could not be contained when he received mail from a real author in his favorite genre. And despite admonitions to the effect of “I cannot promise regular correspondence,” Biggle found himself unable to shake the kid. Correspondence did follow, often intermittent but occasionally timely.

Here is that correspondence.

The J.T. Oliver Photo Collection (1.8MB)
Remembering Al Andrews (4MB)
Letters from Lloyd Biggle, Jr. 1959-1982 (1.5MB)
Remembering Pittcon - 1960 (1.4MB)

 

Last revised: 5 August, 2017

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